Milestones DEVELOPMENTS YOU SHOULD LOOK FOR

Don’t worry if your child doesn’t fit exactly within this guideline. Each child develops differently.

AT 1 MONTH:

  • responds to sounds with blinking, crying, a change in breathing pattern or by showing a startled response
  • lifts head momentarily when Iying down
  • sleeps for three to four hours at a time and stays awake for one or more hours at a stretch
  • crying stops when the child is spoken to or held

AT 2-3 MONTHS:

  • coos and responds to talking with vocal noises
  • becomes interested in visual and audible stimuli
  • responds to parents’ voices and faces
  • when lying down, the child lifts her head, neck and upper chest with the support of the forearms

AT 4-5 MONTHS:

  • when in a prone position, the child holds head erect and raises his body with his hands
  • reaches for and bats at objects
  • head control is greatly improved
  • mobiles are of great interest
  • a social smile is spontaneous
  • able to fall asleep without a bottle or breast-feeding
  • self-comforting

AT 6-8 MONTHS:

  • develops consonant-based sounds (babe, dada, mama)
  • rolls over on her own
  • when sitting, holds head up on her own
  • stands in place with help
  • grasps and mouths objects and starts to self-feed
  • transfers small objects from one hand to another
  • may begin to show anxiety with strangers
  • first tooth erupts

AT 9-11 MONTHS:

  • responds to own name
  • understands words, such as no-no and bye-bye
  • imitates adult vocal sounds
  • plays interactive games, such as peek-a-boo and pat-a-cake
  • crawls, creeps and moves forward by scooting his bottom
  • shakes, bangs, drops and throws objects
  • self-feeds with fingers
  • begins to use a cup
  • occasionally experiences anxiety with strangers

AT 1 YEAR:

  • plays social games
  • bangs blocks together
  • has a one- to three-word vocabulary
  • pulls to a stand and may take a few steps alone
  • drinks from a cup
  • looks for dropped or hidden objects
  • waves good-bye

AT 15-18 MONTHS

  • points to one or more body parts
  • understands simple commands
  • has a 15- to 20-word vocabulary
  • names objects and pictures during reading
  • follows simple directions

AT 2 YEARS:

  • climbs stairs, one step at a time
  • can kick a ball
  • is able to stack blocks
  • follows two-step commands

AT 3 YEARS:

  • can balance on one foot
  • is able to jump in place
  • knows his name, age and gender
  • is able to draw a circle and a cross
  • eats and dresses by himself with supervision

AT 4 YEARS:

  • sings songs
  • has gender awareness
  • understands the difference between fantasy and reality
  • knows her first and last names
  • verbalizes daily activities and experiences
  • can build a block tower up to 10 blocks high
  • is able to hop
  • is able to throw a ball overhand

AT 5 YEARS:

  • dresses without help
  • has his address and telephone number memorized
  • counts on his fingers
  • is able to draw triangles and squares
  • draws a person with a head, body, arms and legs
  • can print some letters
  • plays dress-up and make-believe

AT 6-7 YEARS:

  • all the consonants and vowels should be mastered
  • vocabulary comprehension is about 20,000 words
  • the concept of time should be understood
  • the alphabet and one-syllable words can be printed
  • can read approximately 10 words
  • can count to 100

AT AGE 8 AND ABOVE:

  • reading skills will emerge and improve during the early school years
  • friendships will become important and long lasting during the school years
  • physical growth begins to increase rapidly between ages 10 and 12
  • independence from family begins around age 10

 

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